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Things to bring to an eye exam:

Some things we ask patients to bring to an eye exam are:

  • Present/previous glasses worn
  • Contact lens shipping boxes and wear present contacts to visit-if coming to renew Rx
  • List of medicines-Rx and OTC, and vitamins being taken. This saves time and possibly money for the patient being examined.
     

What Happens in an eye exam

A comprehensive eye exam has 2 functions: 1 test the clarity & efficiency of the visual system & 2 to check ocular health and possible systemic abnormalities through the eyes. Think of it as a physical so to speak.

In the refraction portion lenses are shown in front of each eye separately and later together to test and enhance visual clarity. Then visual function is tested to see if changes are needed to help comfort and visual efficiency.

In the health portion the eyes are systematically analyzed for possible pathology. Since the eyes are connected to the rest of the body by nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue, various body wide (systemic) problems are often seen first in the eye. It’s because the eye is the only place we can see into the body without cutting or probing. As such, the eyes are a good indicator of overall body health.

Medical Visit Vs. Routine eye exam for insurances

Generally a medical visit is to diagnose/monitor a specific eye disease or systemic disease with possible eye pathologies. Examples of this are an eye infection and diabetes. Routine eye exams are situations where the patient is presumed to be healthy & not taking medicines. Routine eye exams can turn into medical eye exams when pathologies are unexpectedly found and need to be treated/documented urgently. Otherwise, patients are rescheduled to diagnose and treat the suspected pathology.

Some “vision plans” only cover routine eye exams, while some “insurances” only cover medical visits &/or testing. Most insurances require a copay for either type of visit. We’ll ask you at the time of making your appointment for both plans, if you have them, so we can bill appropriately.